Sasha Lozaic, a Master of Painting, living and working in Vancouver, British Columbia where the powerful landscape generated by high granite mountains thrown up by unimaginable geologic forces and the constant presence of the world’s largest ocean seeking to tear away and destroy them, inevitably gets reflected in the passion he brings to his craft.

 

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His paintings illustrating these reflections of mine:
Personally, I have grown up with over 70 years of exposure to the crass way in which our consumerist society markets banal and rapidly decaying products, which could never attain the status of icons with a high-level of emotional affect, by attaching icons to their packaging and their advertising (beautiful sexy young women, handsome virile young men, famous entertainers or sports people from the past, or even the present) which do have that emotional affect.

Sasha takes icons, the image of Mozart found on candy wrappers, the images of the Canadian Rocky Mountains displayed everywhere attached to ski chalet ads, tourist ads, shoes and boots, and examines them with the microscope of his intellect allied to complete mastery of the craft of painting in the style of the best of the old Masters. The result is paintings which because of Sasha’s skill and discernment, can themselves become transfixing icons, social statements, intellectual statements, which ought to last and be regarded as part of our history, the way, for example, an original portrait by Gainsborough of the Duke of Wellington and his victory-winning iconic status now is.

Listen below to Sasha describe his thinking and his methods, combined with a slideshow of some of his work. I’m sure you will agree with me that the way Sasha displays how the candy wrapper features of Mozart crumple into various expressions exactly describe our throwaway culture; how we throw away, so our children never get to learn, the most valuable features of the iconic status of this man, his difficult life, his awe-inspiring dedication to producing his glorious music.

And Sasha continues to examine how we deal with the truth of the Rocky Mountains in our lives, throwing away a multitude of images, scarcely ever experiencing the real thrill of these enormous barriers to travel, their huge capacity to generate extreme weather, and great rivers and lakes. For me, Sasha’s paintings of these mountain scenes displays them as hard edged tough containers of immense energy, the underlying reality we know from quantum physics, that even a small amount of their material stores enough energy to wipe put all man-made structures in North America… Which is seldom, maybe never before, represented even in paintings aiming to display their iconic status.

 

My interview with Sasha Lozaic and slideshows of his work:
Theme and How Started
Media
How Evolving
Marketing

Sasha Lozaic Web site: http://lozaic.com/

 

Another Internet place to see his work:

http://www.eastsideculturecrawl.com/artists/sasha

 

Here is how Zoran Eric , art historian, describes Sasha Lozaic’s work:

One of the crucial characteristics of contemporary information society is 
the inundation of images. Manipulation with images makes it possible to control 
the basic human needs, drives and functions as if they were commodities.
These processes led by the mass media and advertising technology are 
increasingly shaping our institutions and our very identity.

The images of commodities are thus entering all levels of society, and the 
cultural sphere is not excluded. The images that we are constantly faced 
with are sometimes recoded and transposed in commercial use, but can be also 
appropriated in the realm of art, what was particularly present in the
 practice of Pop art.

The motive of the series of paintings by Sasha Lozaic is exactly one of the 
icons of consumerist culture in Europe, the candy Mozarts. Lozaic
 position and strategy as artist is not to passively contemplate on the 
aesthetic issues, but to actively read and observe the messages coming from
 the commercial and media world and to manipulate with the codes and images 
that we are saturated with. He is taking the famous, almost iconic motive to 
play with the issues of representation by blurring the recognizable image of 
Mozart from the famous sweets and transforming it into a self-portrait and
 portraits of other people. With this gesture Lozaic is posing the question 
of the altering and even loss of identity of the individual in the 
globalizing tendencies of consumerist culture.

Some initial reflections of mine on his
Recent Works 2007 – 2012

“These emblematic landscapes are easily recognized by the audience for their common Canadian landscape forms which typically happen to be the images of Rocky Mountains.

These are powerful dramatic landscapes in a time context question, is it past or present?” quote from his website.

Sculptural figures of history in a semi-satire, shattering our illusions of these people…immediate and precise control of his media almost metallic surfaces which nonetheless suggest great depths…
the return of Amadeus a narrative of travel across a corrupted and smashed landscape so different from what we imagine his was like, that I am forced to drop my illusions of the man and his time…”in the room the women come and go talking of Michelangelo…” (T.S. Elliot poem, the Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock)

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